Wine Food Farmgate Trail

Find Mornington Peninsula wineries, farm produce, restaurants and more

One of life's greatest pleasures is the Mornington Peninsula - a place where you can eat, drink, forage, shop, learn, and tour. Wine Food Farmgate reveals the Mornington Peninsula’s most delicious secrets. How do you get a sensational seasonal snapshot of the Mornington Peninsula? Just follow the Mornington Peninsula Wine Food Farmgate trail, where you can eat, forage, sip, shop, learn and tour the very best of this region.

Just drive through our region, and the Peninsula's love affair with wine, fresh produce, seafood and bountiful food on the table is quickly revealed. Taste it, sip it, pick it, catch it, take it home with you. Summer brings berries and cherries, while autumn is time for apples and pears.  In winter, forage through the hinterland for seasonal produce, warm up with a meal beside a roaring fire or enjoy your favourite tipple overlooking glorious countryside. Stride out on a beach walk then reward yourself with hot soup or a woodfired pizza and a glass of red wine in a seaside village. Return in the Spring for crisp, fresh vegies and cherry blossom. 

 

You will find many wine, food and farmgate experiences hidden away throughout the Mornington Peninsula. You just need to know where to look. To help you discover them, we've brought the finest together to create the Mornington Peninsula Wine Food Farmgate Trail.

discover wine food farmgate

 
 
Gin Master Class

Gin Master Class

by Mornington Peninsula Tourism - 28/04/2014

Wayne Klintworth and Bob Laing, founders of Bass and Flinders Distillery, warmly greeted our intimate group of eight at the Darling Park Winery cellar door.  A short walk down the hill found us at the distillery.  Bob began our masterclass by providing us with a passionate introduction to distilling; showing the “French designed” Alembic style still and arousing our senses by passing around the scent of a very pure form of the gin.
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Oh... Fudge!

Oh... Fudge!

by Mornington Peninsula Tourism - 18/03/2014

Fudge has (allegedly) only been around for just over 120 years.  It’s one of those glorious mistakes that actually worked out okay.  A batch of caramels ‘gone wrong’ made in the US for Valentines Day in 1886 became what we know today as fudge.   This also explains why when someone makes a mistake, they are said to have ‘fudged’ it…

There is however, no mistaking the expertise of Sue and Tony Wood in the art of making fudge.

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To Market, To Market

To Market, To Market

by Mornington Peninsula Tourism - 17/02/2014

The Red Hill Market started way back in 1975, well before todays passion for meeting the maker to purchase local products. Started by four couples, the concept has grown to see markets run by the team across the state; with two on the Mornington Peninsula.  
Some of the original stall holders are still there, but there is an ever changing menu of home grown and handmade items; seasonal fruit and vegetables, preserves, juices, cider, ale and wine, cakes and biscuits, jewellery, clothes, art, childrens toys, plants and more.

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HAMPER HEAVEN

HAMPER HEAVEN

by Mornington Peninsula Tourism - 18/12/2013

Kym and Ted Smirnoff reckon they have the best job in the world - they get to sample all the delicious Mornington Peninsula goodies before they decide to stock them.  Their business, Peninsula Gourmet Emporium is an Aladdin's cave of delights.  Locally made chutneys, jams and relishes perch alongside biscuits, lollipops and (of course) lots of  lots of  local wine.  Along with all the accoutrements needed to indulge; pate knives, cheese boards and more.

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Cherry Heaven

by Mornington Peninsula Tourism - 27/11/2013

Trevor Holmes is extremely proud of the fact that his pick-your-own cherry orchard is the oldest in Victoria, and possibly Australia.

Originally an apple orchard, Trevor's father turned to growing cherries when the cartage bill to send his apples to the Melbourne Market exceeded the return on the sale of the apples.  He decided there and then never to send fruit to market again.  The following cherry season he put a sign out on the corner of a nearby road and sold the entire crop without leaving his farm. And the customers loved picking the fruit themselves.  Mind you, they were only .05cents

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