Piers & Jetties

Walk the planks, stroll a jetty

With water on three sides of the Mornington Peninsula there are piers and jetties scattered along both the western and eastern coastlines. Some of these structures are made of wood, others more modern alongside marinas and yacht moorings. There is even on with an underwater snorkelling trail at the Rye Pier.

The annual spider crab migration occurs in  autumn where thousands of these crustaceans cover the sandy bay floor and are easily visible for snorkellers around the pier at Rye. Fishing is allowed at most of the piers, and these waters are bountiful indeed. Top Tip: Make sure to have your own fishing licence if you are an adult - you can purchase one from the Mornington Peninsula Visitor Information Centre in Dromana.

Hastings Pier

  
Hastings Pier provides many opportunities for both anglers and the visitors who just enjoy a casual walk, soaking up the surroundings of the busy area. There is a Visitor Centre located on the pier with a waterfront cafe nearby.
Pelicans can normally be seen in this area and are fed daily by local fishermen. Angling is most productive at high tide, those who are keen could expect to catch a variety of fish including: King George whiting, Australian salmon, silver trevally and flathead.

Hastings is located on a crescent-shaped bay opening onto Western Port. It is probably the safest small boat harbour on Western Port, as it is easily accessible, and protected from prevailing winds.

The mudflats support significant mangrove forests, these being the most southerly species of mangrove in the world. Jacks Beach Walk takes hikers through and over the mangroves via a series of boardwalks. The mangrove forests are natural fish hatcheries, important for the maintenance of good fish populations in the bay.
A significant area of Western Port north of Hastings has been declared a Marine National Park.

  • Special Features:
Boating Facilities, Carpark, Public Telephone

2 Marine Parade
Hastings Victoria 3915
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